Scar formation is a natural part of the wound healing process. Scars are formed by fibrous connective tissue assisting would repair in the skin and other body tissues. Scars are formed on the skin, underlying tissue, and internal organs where an injury occurred, an incision was made, some part of the body was cut, or a disease infected and caused damage to the tissue. The damaged tissue is replaced by scar tissue to maintain the normal body processes (Waibel & Rudnick, 2015), but scar tissue is unlike normal tissue and may cause pain and limitations in motion, thus needing medical intervention.

Scar formation on organs or muscles can alter the way the tissue moves. Movement is altered around a scar because the flexibility of the scar tissue is different from that of normal tissue. The scar tissue is weak and less elastic. It is vulnerable to injury.

Smaller forms of scar tissue are called adhesions. Adhesions cause the inability of tissue to glide and slide over one another, resulting in stiffness and reduction in strength and range of motion. The nerves become entrapped in the tissue instead of being able to slide through the muscles, which limits range of motion of the involved limb.

Reduced range of motion can be avoided with a prescription of manual therapy and correct motion exercises to help avoid myofascial adhesions around the affected area. Treatment of scars can be easily performed in chiropractic, massage, or physical therapy clinics. For the best outcomes to improve scar tissue flexibility, intervene as early as one can without disrupting tissue healing. Using kinesiology tape can help lift the skin allow for fluid to move easier to the heart.

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